Tooth Extractions

What Is It?

Tooth extraction is the removal of a tooth from its socket in the bone.

What It’s Used For

If a tooth has been broken or damaged by decay, Dr.Silver or Dr.Forrester will try to fix it with a filling, crown or other treatment. Sometimes, though, there’s too much damage for the tooth to be repaired. In this case, the tooth needs to be extracted. A very loose tooth also will require extraction if it can’t be saved, even with bone replacement surgery (bone graft).

Follow-Up

Dr.Silver or Dr. Forrester will give you detailed instructions on what to do and what to expect after your surgery. If you have any questions, make sure to ask them before you leave the office.

Having a tooth taken out is surgery. You can expect some discomfort after even simple extractions. Usually it is mild.

Surgical extractions generally cause more pain after the procedure than simple extractions. The level of discomfort and how long it lasts will depend on how difficult it was to remove the tooth.

You can put ice packs on your face to reduce swelling. Typically, they are left on for 20 minutes at a time and removed for 20 minutes. If your jaw is sore and stiff after the swelling goes away, try warm compresses.

Eat soft and cool foods for a few days. Then try other food as you feel comfortable.

A gentle rinse with warm salt water, started 24 hours after the surgery, can help to keep the area clean. Use one-half teaspoon of salt in a cup of water. Most swelling and bleeding end within a day or two after the surgery. Initial healing takes at least two weeks.

If you need stitches, your doctor may use the kind that dissolve on their own. This usually takes one to two weeks. Rinsing with warm salt water will help the stitches to dissolve. Some stitches need to be removed by the dentist or surgeon.

You should not smoke, use a straw or spit after surgery. These actions can pull the blood clot out of the hole where the tooth was. Do not smoke on the day of surgery. Do not smoke for 24 to 72 hours after having a tooth extracted.

Risks

A problem called a dry socket develops in about 3% to 4% of all extractions. This occurs when a blood clot doesn’t form in the hole or the blood clot breaks off or breaks down too early.

In a dry socket, the underlying bone is exposed to air and food. This can be very painful and can cause a bad odor or taste. Typically dry sockets begin to cause pain the third day after surgery.

Dry socket occurs up to 30% of the time when impacted teeth are removed. It is also more likely after difficult extractions. Smokers and women who take birth control pills are more likely to have a dry socket. Smoking on the day of surgery further increases the risk. A dry socket needs to be treated with a medicated dressing to stop the pain and encourage the area to heal.

When To Call a Professional

Call your oral surgeon if:

  • The swelling gets worse instead of better.
  • You have fever, chills or redness
  • You have trouble swallowing
  • You have uncontrolled bleeding in the area
  • The area continues to ooze or bleed after the first 24 hours
  • Your tongue, chin or lip feels numb more than 3 to 4 hours after the procedure
  • The extraction site becomes very painful — This may be a sign that you have developed a dry socket.

If you have an infection, your dentist usually will prescribe antibiotics.

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Call us at Silver Periodontics & Implant Dentistry Phone Number 856-810-8400 if you have any questions or to schedule an appointment with Drs. Silver and Forrester today!